Abuse, Physical Abuse, Emotional Abuse, Dating Abuse

emotional child abuse

Abuse, Physical Abuse, Emotional Abuse, Dating Abuse

Abuse, Physical Abuse, Emotional Abuse, and Dating Abuse are big problems, affecting youth in every community across the nation. Learn the facts below.

Nearly 1.5 million high school students nationwide experience physical abuse from a dating partner in a single year.

One in three girls in the US is a victim of physical, emotional or verbal abuse from a dating partner, a figure that far exceeds rates of other types of youth violence.

One in ten high school students has been purposefully hit, slapped or physically hurt by a boyfriend or girlfriend.

Why Focus on Young People?

Girls and young women between the ages of 16 and 24 experience the highest rate of intimate partner violence, almost triple the national average.

Among female victims of intimate partner violence, 94% of those age 16-19 and 70% of those age 20-24 were victimized by a current or former boyfriend or girlfriend.

Violent behavior often begins between the ages of 12 and 18.

The severity of intimate partner violence is often greater in cases where the pattern of abuse was established in adolescence.

I explain the importance of your adolescent years and the impact they have on your relationships in my manifesto: How to Love with Logical Outcomes, available for download on my site.

Don’t Forget About College Students

Nearly half (43%) of dating college women report experiencing violent and abusive dating behaviors.

College students are not equipped to deal with dating abuse 57% say it is difficult to identify and 58% say they don’t know how to help someone who’s experiencing it.

One in three (36%) dating college students has given a dating partner their computer, email or social network passwords and these students are more likely to experience digital dating abuse.

One in six (36%) college women has been sexually abused in a dating relationship.

Long-lasting Effects:

Violent relationships in adolescence can have serious ramifications by putting the victims at higher risk for substance abuse, eating disorders, risky sexual behavior and further domestic violence.

Being physically or sexually abused makes teen girls six times more likely to become pregnant and twice as likely to get a STD.

Half of youth who have been victims of both dating violence and rape, attempt suicide, compared to 12.5% of non-abused girls and 5.4% of non-abused boys.

Lack of Awareness

Only 33% of teens who were in an abusive relationship ever told anyone about the abuse.

Eighty-one (81%) percent of parents believe teen dating violence is not an issue or admit they don’t know if it’s an issue.

Though 82% of parents feel confident that they could recognize the signs if their child was experiencing dating abuse, a majority of parents (58%) could not correctly identify all the warning signs of abuse.

Physical abuse is any intentional and unwanted contact with you or something close to your body. Sometimes abusive behavior does not cause pain or even leave a bruise, but it’s still unhealthy.

Examples of physical abuse are:

  • Scratching, punching, biting, strangling or kicking.
  • Throwing something at you such as a phone, book, shoe or plate.
  • Pulling your hair.
  • Pushing or pulling you.
  • Grabbing your clothing.
  • Using a gun, knife, box cutter, bat, mace or other weapon.
  • Smacking your bottom.
  • Forcing you to have sex or perform a sexual act.
  • Grabbing your face to make you look at them.
  • Grabbing you to prevent you from leaving or to force you to go somewhere.

There are many behaviors that qualify as emotional or verbal abuse:

  • Yelling and screaming at you. Calling you names
  • Intentionally embarrassing you in public.
  • Preventing you from seeing or talking with friends and family.
  • Telling you what to do and wear.
  • Damaging your property when they’re angry (throwing objects, punching walls, kicking doors, etc.)
  • Using online communities or cell phones to co
  • Calling you names and putting you down.
  • Control, intimidate or humiliate you.
  • Blaming your actions for their abusive or unhealthy behavior.
  • Accusing you of cheating and often being jealous of your outside relationships.
  • Stalking you.
  • Threatening to commit suicide to keep you from breaking up with them.
  • Threatening to harm you, your pet or people you care about.
  • Making you feel guilty or immature when you don’t consent to sexual activity.
  • Threatening to expose your secrets such as your sexual orientation or immigration status.
  • Starting rumors about you.
  • Threatening to have your children taken away.
  • This is a great resource and the major contributor to this article.
  • loveisrespect.org

Thank you for your interest in my work. Please read my blog: www.LoveWithLogic.com and click on Mind/Body Connection

 

 


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